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Lake Arapuni Trout Fishing

After our success at Lake Karapiro, we again focussed on the faster moving water at the top of the Lake but this time we ditched the tinny's and went with a larger fibreglass boat that we could all fit on. With comfortable padded seats, this was definitely an upgrade from the tinny's!
This time we tried fishing deep, drifting with the current and bouncing flies along the bottom with sinkers and spinning rods. After a number of frustrating snags, we tied up to fish the mouth of the Mangawhio stream.

This time I was fishing one of my own articulated fly designs I call a "Road Killer". A lot of copper flashabou, mallard flank feathers and a large black head made of possum tail fur with large white foam eyes – inspired by the black and gold Toby. I fished this on a spinning rod below a ball sinker with a fast jerky retrieve but it would have had a better action on a fly rod with a jerk strip retrieve. I prefer fishing a fly rod but I've learned a lot about fishing steamers by fishing them on a spinning rod. I watched as 2 different fish swiped at this fly on successive casts, trying to ambush it from below as it came from the shallower stream and out into the deeper water. We couldn't see these fish until they attacked the fly within metres of the boat, as the water coming from the inflowing stream was fairly discoloured. Then one of these fish connected and we got a 3lb rainbow to the boat. That was our only success on this trip.
When we fished Arapuni, it rained a lot. This would become a common trend for the Hydro Explorer Tour. While we blamed our fishing success on the miserable weather, we have since had good success in these conditions on other trips. The main thing is to wear gear that keeps you dry and keep fishing, trying different methods to pick up fish.

After a successful trip on Karapiro, this time on Arapuni we felt like Hydro Lake fishing noobs again. Next up, Waipapa!


 

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